Throughout the years of helping seniors navigate Medicare, Social Security and Long Term Care Planning we hear the following questions the most. We thought it best to answer them right away.

How long have you been offering Medicare workshops.

EducateU is based on the highly popular workshop offering, Understanding Medicare. Understanding Medicare workshops have been available as community based events for 20+ years. It was decided late last year to formally establish EducateU as a separate company in order to expand our services and market reach. In 2013, we will begin formal offerings of our Understanding Social Security and Understanding Long Term Care workshops. EducateU, via our web portal www.EducateUonline.com, will be our platform for growth.

How does EducateU make money (get paid)?

EducateU workshops and events are funded with the support of our local community sponsors, advisor community and certified Alliance members. EducateU makes most events available at no cost to participants. Occasionally EducateU will charge a small fee per attendees where no sponsor is involved. In addition, EducateU works directly with our corporate clients to provide fee based education and resources available to their aging employee base.

Does EducateU make commissions if I buy Medicare or Long Term Care insurance from one of your alliance or insurance carrier sponsors?

No. EducateU does not participate in any way with the process of proposing, selecting or selling insurance products or financial services. Whether to pursue a relationship with any event sponsor is solely up to you.

Is EducateU a non-profit corporation/company?

No. EducateU is an LLC (Limited Liability Company) in the State of Minnesota. We have operations in Minnesota and California.

Do you have a question for EducateU?

Find more answers to commonlly asked questions by visiting the resource sections of our webite.
Frequently Asked Questions and Answers about:

Or simply call our company offices at (763) 235-4766 or reach us by email info@EducateUonline.com.

How much can I earn while receiving Social Security retirement benefits?

The amount you can earn while receiving Social Security depends on your age. Your earnings in (and after) the month you reach full retirement age will not affect your Social Security benefits. However, your benefit is reduced if your earnings exceed certain limits for the months before you reach your full retirement age. If you are under full retirement age for the entire year:

  • You can earn $15,520 gross wages or net self-employment a year and not lose any benefits in 2013.
  • We will deduct $1 in benefits for every $2 earned above $15,120.

In the year you reach full retirement age:

  • You can earn $40,080 gross wages or net self-employment prior to the month you reach full retirement age and not lose any benefits in 2013.
  • We will deduct $1 in benefits for every $3 earned above $40,080.

The same earnings limits apply to a spouse or child who works and receives benefits on your record. You should report earnings to us for any months and years prior to full retirement age. Use the Retirement Earnings Test Calculator to get an estimate of the effect of your earnings on your benefits. If you work outside the United States, refer to Your Payments While Outside The United States.

How do I replace my Social Security card?

To get a replacement card: Step 1: Gather documents proving your:

Step 2: Complete an Application for a Social Security Card. Step 3: Take or mail your completed application and documents to your local Social Security office or your local Social Security Card Center. All documents must be either originals or certified copies by the issuing agency. Social Security cannot accept photocopies or notarized copies of documents.  Any documents you mail to Social Security will be returned to you along with a receipt. Important Information Social Security will mail your card as soon as they have verified your documents.  You should receive your card within 10 business days from the date on your receipt.  Your replacement card will have the same number as your previous card. You may not need to get a replacement card. Knowing your Social Security number is what is important. You need a Social Security number to get a job, collect Social Security benefits and receive some government services but you do not often need to show your Social Security card.

How do I change the name on a Social Security card?

To change your name on your Social Security card:

Step 1: Gather documents proving your:

Step 2: Complete an Application for a Social Security card. Step 3: Take or mail your completed application and documents to your local Social Security office. All documents must be either originals or certified copies by the issuing agency. Social Security cannot accept photocopies or notarized copies of documents. Any documents you mail to Social Security will be returned to you along with a receipt. Important Information Social Security will mail your card as soon as they have verified your documents. You should receive your card within 10 business days from the date on your receipt. The new card will have the same number as your previous card, but will show your new name.

How do I order a replacement Medicare Card?

MyMedicare.gov allows you to order a replacement Medicare card. To do so, select the Order Card button located on the Replacement Medicare Card tab from the My Account page. Replacement Medicare cards can only be sent to the address of record on file with the Social Security Administration. Please make sure that your address on the Replacement Medicare Card tab is your current address before ordering a replacement Medicare card. It may take up to 4 weeks for you to receive your new Medicare card. If you choose to receive an entitlement letter by checking the check box located on the Replacement Medicare Card tab from the My Account page, you will receive an entitlement letter within 14 days of your successful replacement Medicare card request. For your protection, you will not be able to order a replacement Medicare card, if one has been ordered in the last 30 days.

What is an Authorized Representative?

An Authorized Representative is a person you choose to assist you with Medicare-related matters, such as:

  • Choosing a plan to participate in;
  • Gathering more information about your insurance plan/policies for research and decision making purposes;
  • Handling claims and/or payments;
  • Receiving a notice in connection with an appeal on your behalf, and review/submit personal medical information when working with associated appeals.

What information should I have before completing my Initial Enrollment Questionnaire (IEQ)?

Before completing your IEQ, you should have the following information available:

  • Your insurance card, for insurance company and prescription drug information; Your employer’s name and address (if you receive group health plan coverage through your employer);
  • Your spouse’s Social Security number, employer’s name and address, and the group health plan information (if you receive group health plan coverage through your spouse’s employer);
  • Your family member’s Social Security number, employer’s name and address, and the group health plan information (if you receive group health plan coverage through your family member’s employer) The associated insurance  carrier information, employer name and attorney information, if you are receiving benefits or treatment for one of the following conditions:
    • Black Lung benefits
    • Workers’ Compensation benefits
    • Injury or illness for which another person could be held responsible
    • Injury or illness covered under no fault, automobile or liability insurance

Where can I find answers to my Medicare questions?

Medicare.gov was redesigned to make it faster and easier for you to answer your Medicare questions. To get more information about a certain topic, click on a link below:

Who provides long term care services?

Unpaid family caregivers provide most long term care. Spouses, adult children and other family members provide a majority of care. Formal or paid caregivers, ranging from home health aides, certified nursing assistants, social workers, nurses, occupational therapists, and geriatric case managers, are a few examples of professionals involved in offering long term care services.

Where are most long term care services provided?

More than 80% of elders requiring assistance with ADLs or IADLs live at home or in a community setting. The other 20% live in nursing homes or with their families. Most people who need long term care do not need skilled nursing care, but other personal and social services.

What are some examples of long term care services?

  • Home health care
  • Personal care
  • Nursing home care (skilled nursing facilities)
  • Informal care from friends and relatives
  • Social services
  • Assisted living (help bathing, taking medications, providing meals)
  • Adult day care
  • Meals on Wheels

What is long term care? Understanding the Basics

Defining Long Term Care What comes to your mind when you hear the words “long term care?” The reality of long term care is often much different than many think. Long term care has changed greatly in the past few years adding to the confusion. If you have had experience with parents or grandparents, what you saw and knew as long term care will be different today. Long term care is a term used to describe a variety of personal care, social and medical services provided to help people with daily living activities and to remain as independent as possible. Typical users of long term care have chronic health problems, physical illnesses, or mental disabilites that limit their ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) or instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs).

ADLS include: Bathing Dressing Toileting Eating Getting around the house
IADLs include: Preparing meals Shopping Managing money Using the telephone Doing housework Taking medication

How much care will you need?

Service and support needs vary from person to person and often change over time.

  • On average, someone who is 65 today will need some type of long-term care services and supports for three years.
  • Women need care longer (on average 3.7 years) than men (on average 2.2 years), mostly because women usually live longer.
  • While about one-third of today’s 65-year-olds may never need long-term care services and supports, 20 percent will need care for longer than 5 years.

If you need long-term care services and supports, you may receive or use one or more of the following:

  • Assistance with personal care or other activities from an unpaid caregiver who may be a family member or friend
  • Services in your home from a nurse, home health or home care aide, therapist, or homemaker
  • Services in the community such as adult day services
  • Care in any of a variety of long-term care facilities

Will you need Long Term Care?

About 70 percent of people over age 65 will require some type of long-term care services during their lifetime. More than 40 percent will need care in a nursing home. Things that increase your risk or make it more likely that you’ll need long-term care include:

  • Age: The older you get, the more likely it is that you’ll need help.
  • Living alone: If you live alone, you’re more likely to need paid care than if you’re married or single and living with a partner.
  • Gender: Women are more likely to need long-term care than men, primarily because women tend to live longer.
  • Lifestyle: Poor diet and exercise habits increase the chance that you’ll need long-term care.
  • Personal history: Health and family history can increase the chances you’ll need long-term care.

Who needs Long Term Care?

    You need long-term care when you are not able to complete personal care or other daily activities on your own. This is most often the result of a chronic illness or disability. In some cases, the illness or disability may include memory loss, confusion, or disorientation, sometimes called cognitive impairment. This can be the result of conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease.

      I understand that there are new benefits available to Uniformed Services retirees and their dependents. What are these benefits? Who is eligible?

      The Department of Defense implemented TRICARE for Life (TFL) on October 1, 2001. TRICARE for Life provides expanded medical coverage for: Medicare-eligible uniformed services retirees, including retired National Guard members and reservists; Medicare-eligible family members and widows/widowers; and certain former spouses if they were eligible for TRICARE before age 65. You must be 65 or over and have Medicare Part A and Part B to be eligible for TFL. If eligible, you get all Medicare-covered benefits under the Original Medicare Plan, plus all TFL-covered benefits. If you use a Medicare provider, Medicare will be the first payer for all Medicare-covered services, and TFL will be the second payer. TFL will pay all Medicare co-payments and deductibles and cover most of the costs of certain care not covered by Medicare. When only Medicare covers a benefit (for example, chiropractic care), you will generally be responsible for any remaining costs after Medicare has paid the provider. When only TRICARE covers a benefit (for example, prescription drugs), you will generally be responsible for all TRICARE co-payments and deductibles. The amounts Medicare and TRICARE will pay are based on your use of a Medicare provider. To get more information about TRICARE for Life, call 1-888-DOD-LIFE (1-888-363-5433) or look at theTRICARE web site. Call 1-800-538-9552 for other military retiree eligibility and benefit questions.

      Will I pay more for my Medicare Part B premium if I earn a lot of money each year?

      If your income is above a certain amount, then you may have to pay a higher Medicare Part B premium.  If your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) as reported on your IRS tax return from 2 years ago is above a certain amount, you may pay more for your monthly Part B premium:

      Can I delay my Medicare Part B enrollment without paying higher premiums?

      If you can delay your enrollment because you or your spouse are still working, the General Enrollment Period will not affect you until after you (or your spouse) stop working.

        What if I’m over 65 and didn’t enroll in Part B during my Initial Enrollment Period?

          Your Initial Enrollment Period starts 3 months before you turn age 65 and lasts for 7 months. Except in certain cases, if you do not enroll in Medicare Part B during your Initial Enrollment Period, you will have to wait until the next General Enrollment Period to enroll. General Enrollment Periods are between January 1 and March 31 each year. When March 31 falls on a non-business day, the General Enrollment Period is extended to the next business day. If you sign up for Medicare Part B during a General Enrollment Period, your coverage starts on July 1 of that year. Your Medicare Part B premium may go up 10 percent for each 12-month period that you could have had Medicare Part B, but did not take it.

            How do I pay my Medicare premium?

            The premium is deducted from your Social Security deposit or, if you’ve yet to activate Social Security, you are billed quarterly.

            Do I need to formalize my Social Security election to obtain access to Medicare Programs?

            No. Enrollment in Social Security is not required to be eligible for Medicare.

            Do I need to activate my Social Security income in order to obtain Medicare?

            No. Enrollment in Social Security is not required to be eligible for Medicare.

              What does EducateU do?

                We provide education for senior citizens and those who help senior citizens. We provide workshops, webinars and online information. Our focus is education on a variety of levels. We are committed to complete objectivity in all of our information sessions and workshops. We commit to giving you the information you need to make engaged, informed and timely decisions regarding Medicare, Social Security, Long Term Care and more.

                  Who is EducateU?

                  We are an independent educational resource that specializes in educating seniors about Medicare enrollment, Social Security elections, Long Term Care planning and more. We work with individuals, community organizations, employer groups and professional advisors. Our mission is to empower seniors as they make informed decisions.

                  How long have you been doing Medicare workshops?

                  EducateU is based on the highly popular workshop offering Understanding Medicare. Understanding Medicare workshops have been available as community based events for 20+ years. In 2013 EducateU was formally established as a separate company in order to expand our services and market reach.

                  Frequently Asked Questions

                  How much can I earn while receiving Social Security retirement benefits?
                  The amount you can earn while receiving Social Security depends on your age. Your earnings in (and after) the month you reach full retirement age will not affect your Social Security benefits. However, your benefit is reduced if your earnings exceed certain limits for the months before you reach your full retirement age. If you are under full retirement age for the entire year:
                  • You can earn $15,520 gross wages or net self-employment a year and not lose any benefits in 2013.
                  • We will deduct $1 in benefits for every $2 earned above $15,120.
                  In the year you reach full retirement age:
                  • You can earn $40,080 gross wages or net self-employment prior to the month you reach full retirement age and not lose any benefits in 2013.
                  • We will deduct $1 in benefits for every $3 earned above $40,080.
                  The same earnings limits apply to a spouse or child who works and receives benefits on your record. You should report earnings to us for any months and years prior to full retirement age. Use the Retirement Earnings Test Calculator to get an estimate of the effect of your earnings on your benefits. If you work outside the United States, refer to Your Payments While Outside The United States.
                  How do I replace my Social Security card?
                  To get a replacement card: Step 1: Gather documents proving your:Step 2: Complete an Application for a Social Security Card. Step 3: Take or mail your completed application and documents to your local Social Security office or your local Social Security Card Center. All documents must be either originals or certified copies by the issuing agency. Social Security cannot accept photocopies or notarized copies of documents.  Any documents you mail to Social Security will be returned to you along with a receipt. Important Information Social Security will mail your card as soon as they have verified your documents.  You should receive your card within 10 business days from the date on your receipt.  Your replacement card will have the same number as your previous card. You may not need to get a replacement card. Knowing your Social Security number is what is important. You need a Social Security number to get a job, collect Social Security benefits and receive some government services but you do not often need to show your Social Security card.
                  How do I change the name on a Social Security card?
                  To change your name on your Social Security card:
                  Step 1: Gather documents proving your: Step 2: Complete an Application for a Social Security card. Step 3: Take or mail your completed application and documents to your local Social Security office. All documents must be either originals or certified copies by the issuing agency. Social Security cannot accept photocopies or notarized copies of documents. Any documents you mail to Social Security will be returned to you along with a receipt. Important Information Social Security will mail your card as soon as they have verified your documents. You should receive your card within 10 business days from the date on your receipt. The new card will have the same number as your previous card, but will show your new name.
                  How do I order a replacement Medicare Card?
                  MyMedicare.gov allows you to order a replacement Medicare card. To do so, select the Order Card button located on the Replacement Medicare Card tab from the My Account page. Replacement Medicare cards can only be sent to the address of record on file with the Social Security Administration. Please make sure that your address on the Replacement Medicare Card tab is your current address before ordering a replacement Medicare card. It may take up to 4 weeks for you to receive your new Medicare card. If you choose to receive an entitlement letter by checking the check box located on the Replacement Medicare Card tab from the My Account page, you will receive an entitlement letter within 14 days of your successful replacement Medicare card request. For your protection, you will not be able to order a replacement Medicare card, if one has been ordered in the last 30 days.
                  What is an Authorized Representative?
                  An Authorized Representative is a person you choose to assist you with Medicare-related matters, such as:
                  • Choosing a plan to participate in;
                  • Gathering more information about your insurance plan/policies for research and decision making purposes;
                  • Handling claims and/or payments;
                  • Receiving a notice in connection with an appeal on your behalf, and review/submit personal medical information when working with associated appeals.
                  What information should I have before completing my Initial Enrollment Questionnaire (IEQ)?
                  Before completing your IEQ, you should have the following information available:
                  • Your insurance card, for insurance company and prescription drug information; Your employer’s name and address (if you receive group health plan coverage through your employer);
                  • Your spouse’s Social Security number, employer’s name and address, and the group health plan information (if you receive group health plan coverage through your spouse’s employer);
                  • Your family member’s Social Security number, employer’s name and address, and the group health plan information (if you receive group health plan coverage through your family member’s employer) The associated insurance  carrier information, employer name and attorney information, if you are receiving benefits or treatment for one of the following conditions:
                    • Black Lung benefits
                    • Workers’ Compensation benefits
                    • Injury or illness for which another person could be held responsible
                    • Injury or illness covered under no fault, automobile or liability insurance
                  Where can I find answers to my Medicare questions?
                  Medicare.gov was redesigned to make it faster and easier for you to answer your Medicare questions. To get more information about a certain topic, click on a link below:
                  Who provides long term care services?
                  Unpaid family caregivers provide most long term care. Spouses, adult children and other family members provide a majority of care. Formal or paid caregivers, ranging from home health aides, certified nursing assistants, social workers, nurses, occupational therapists, and geriatric case managers, are a few examples of professionals involved in offering long term care services.
                  Where are most long term care services provided?
                  More than 80% of elders requiring assistance with ADLs or IADLs live at home or in a community setting. The other 20% live in nursing homes or with their families. Most people who need long term care do not need skilled nursing care, but other personal and social services.
                  What are some examples of long term care services?
                  • Home health care
                  • Personal care
                  • Nursing home care (skilled nursing facilities)
                  • Informal care from friends and relatives
                  • Social services
                  • Assisted living (help bathing, taking medications, providing meals)
                  • Adult day care
                  • Meals on Wheels 
                  What is long term care? Understanding the Basics
                  Defining Long Term Care What comes to your mind when you hear the words “long term care?” The reality of long term care is often much different than many think. Long term care has changed greatly in the past few years adding to the confusion. If you have had experience with parents or grandparents, what you saw and knew as long term care will be different today. Long term care is a term used to describe a variety of personal care, social and medical services provided to help people with daily living activities and to remain as independent as possible. Typical users of long term care have chronic health problems, physical illnesses, or mental disabilites that limit their ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) or instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs).

                  ADLS include: Bathing Dressing Toileting Eating Getting around the house
                  IADLs include: Preparing meals Shopping Managing money Using the telephone Doing housework Taking medication 
                  How much care will you need?
                  Service and support needs vary from person to person and often change over time.
                  • On average, someone who is 65 today will need some type of long-term care services and supports for three years.
                  • Women need care longer (on average 3.7 years) than men (on average 2.2 years), mostly because women usually live longer.
                  • While about one-third of today’s 65-year-olds may never need long-term care services and supports, 20 percent will need care for longer than 5 years.
                  If you need long-term care services and supports, you may receive or use one or more of the following:
                  • Assistance with personal care or other activities from an unpaid caregiver who may be a family member or friend
                  • Services in your home from a nurse, home health or home care aide, therapist, or homemaker
                  • Services in the community such as adult day services
                  • Care in any of a variety of long-term care facilities
                  Will you need Long Term Care?
                  About 70 percent of people over age 65 will require some type of long-term care services during their lifetime. More than 40 percent will need care in a nursing home. Things that increase your risk or make it more likely that you’ll need long-term care include:
                  • Age: The older you get, the more likely it is that you’ll need help.
                  • Living alone: If you live alone, you’re more likely to need paid care than if you’re married or single and living with a partner.
                  • Gender: Women are more likely to need long-term care than men, primarily because women tend to live longer.
                  • Lifestyle: Poor diet and exercise habits increase the chance that you’ll need long-term care.
                  • Personal history: Health and family history can increase the chances you’ll need long-term care.
                  Who needs Long Term Care?
                  You need long-term care when you are not able to complete personal care or other daily activities on your own. This is most often the result of a chronic illness or disability. In some cases, the illness or disability may include memory loss, confusion, or disorientation, sometimes called cognitive impairment. This can be the result of conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease.
                  I understand that there are new benefits available to Uniformed Services retirees and their dependents. What are these benefits? Who is eligible?

                  The Department of Defense implemented TRICARE for Life (TFL) on October 1, 2001. TRICARE for Life provides expanded medical coverage for: Medicare-eligible uniformed services retirees, including retired National Guard members and reservists; Medicare-eligible family members and widows/widowers; and certain former spouses if they were eligible for TRICARE before age 65. You must be 65 or over and have Medicare Part A and Part B to be eligible for TFL. If eligible, you get all Medicare-covered benefits under the Original Medicare Plan, plus all TFL-covered benefits. If you use a Medicare provider, Medicare will be the first payer for all Medicare-covered services, and TFL will be the second payer. TFL will pay all Medicare co-payments and deductibles and cover most of the costs of certain care not covered by Medicare. When only Medicare covers a benefit (for example, chiropractic care), you will generally be responsible for any remaining costs after Medicare has paid the provider. When only TRICARE covers a benefit (for example, prescription drugs), you will generally be responsible for all TRICARE co-payments and deductibles. The amounts Medicare and TRICARE will pay are based on your use of a Medicare provider. To get more information about TRICARE for Life, call 1-888-DOD-LIFE (1-888-363-5433) or look at theTRICARE web site. Call 1-800-538-9552 for other military retiree eligibility and benefit questions.

                  Will I pay more for my Medicare Part B premium if I earn a lot of money each year?
                  If your income is above a certain amount, then you may have to pay a higher Medicare Part B premium.  If your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) as reported on your IRS tax return from 2 years ago is above a certain amount, you may pay more for your monthly Part B premium:
                  Can I delay my Medicare Part B enrollment without paying higher premiums?
                  If you can delay your enrollment because you or your spouse are still working, the General Enrollment Period will not affect you until after you (or your spouse) stop working.
                  What if I’m over 65 and didn’t enroll in Part B during my Initial Enrollment Period?
                  Your Initial Enrollment Period starts 3 months before you turn age 65 and lasts for 7 months. Except in certain cases, if you do not enroll in Medicare Part B during your Initial Enrollment Period, you will have to wait until the next General Enrollment Period to enroll. General Enrollment Periods are between January 1 and March 31 each year. When March 31 falls on a non-business day, the General Enrollment Period is extended to the next business day. If you sign up for Medicare Part B during a General Enrollment Period, your coverage starts on July 1 of that year. Your Medicare Part B premium may go up 10 percent for each 12-month period that you could have had Medicare Part B, but did not take it.
                  How do I pay my Medicare premium?
                  The premium is deducted from your Social Security deposit or, if you’ve yet to activate Social Security, you are billed quarterly.
                  Do I need to formalize my Social Security election to obtain access to Medicare Programs?
                  No. Enrollment in Social Security is not required to be eligible for Medicare.
                  Do I need to activate my Social Security income in order to obtain Medicare?
                  No. Enrollment in Social Security is not required to be eligible for Medicare.
                  What does EducateU do?
                  We provide education for senior citizens and those who help senior citizens. We provide workshops, webinars and online information. Our focus is education on a variety of levels. We are committed to complete objectivity in all of our information sessions and workshops. We commit to giving you the information you need to make engaged, informed and timely decisions regarding Medicare, Social Security, Long Term Care and more.
                  Who is EducateU?
                  We are an independent educational resource that specializes in educating seniors about Medicare enrollment, Social Security elections, Long Term Care planning and more. We work with individuals, community organizations, employer groups and professional advisors. Our mission is to empower seniors as they make informed decisions.
                  How long have you been doing Medicare workshops?
                  EducateU is based on the highly popular workshop offering Understanding Medicare. Understanding Medicare workshops have been available as community based events for 20+ years. In 2013 EducateU was formally established as a separate company in order to expand our services and market reach.
                  Is EducateU a non-profit corporation/company?
                  No. EducateU is an LLC (Limited Liability Company) in the State of Minnesota. We have operations in Minnesota and California.
                  Does EducateU make commissions if I buy Medicare or Long Term Care insurance from a Network Member or insurance carrier sponsors?
                  No. EducateU does not participate in any way with the process of proposing, selecting or selling insurance products or financial services. Whether to pursue a relationship with any event sponsor is solely up to you.
                  How does EducateU make money (get paid)?
                  EducateU workshops and events are funded with the support of our local community sponsors, advisor community and Network Members. EducateU makes most events available at no cost to participants. Occasionally EducateU will charge a small fee per attendees where no sponsor is involved. In addition, EducateU works directly with our corporate clients to provide fee based education and resources available to their aging employee base.